Posts

Anco FIT – Managing cost-effectiveness of pig diets

Consistency in the cost-effectiveness of pig diets can be difficult to control, but determines profitability. Anco FIT focuses on managing gut agility for more reliable returns.

With up to 70% of production costs coming from the cost of feed, consistency in the cost-effectiveness of diets is key to profitability. To maximize profit opportunity, producers must be diligent in developing feeding strategies that result in best returns over feed and/or margin over feed and facility costs. However, nutritional stressors in the diet, such as reduced nutrient digestibility, endotoxins, antinutrients and mycotoxins, often throw a spanner in the works of consistency in performance in response to diets. Depending on the increased presence or absence of those stressors the same diet can differ in cost-effectiveness. These stressors are often not easy to control for the nutritionist and are part of the reality that animals are facing in modern production systems.

Nutritional stressors reduce cost-efficiency

When challenged with nutritional stress factors, stress reactions such as oxidative stress, reduced gut integrity, inflammation, reduced appetite and shifts in gut microflora will be triggered in the pig. This not only reduces growth performance, but also feed efficiency and thus the cost-effectiveness of diets. Feed efficiency is reduced due to energy wasted on stress reactions instead of being used for productive purposes.

For instance, under oxidative stress and inflammation, 30% of the performance drop is explained by the catabolism and feed conversion needed to manage inflammation.

Oxidative stress is defined as the presence of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in excess of the available antioxidant capacity of animal cells. Oxidative stress is a major factor related to the development of inflammatory diseases.

Increases in intestinal permeability raise the possibility of translocation of bacteria and/or their toxins across the more permeable gut barrier. The resulting endotoxemia can trigger disease onset and progression. The increase in translocation of endotoxins across the intestinal barrier can also stimulate immune cells to secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines and prostaglandins like PGE2, resulting in low-grade inflammation, which again can waste metabolic energy.

Regardless of the triggering cause, the innate immune and inflammatory response is triggered in the pig to achieve a better ability to deal with infectious and noninfectious stressors. At the same time this response needs to be accurately controlled to avoid tissue damage and waste of metabolic energy.

Certain mycotoxins, such as DON (deoxynivalenol) are known to cause the type of stress reactions mentioned above in pigs. DON also has a significant impact on feed intake in pigs, resulting in reduced growth performance. It is globally the most prevalent mycotoxin in feed stuffs and difficult to control. Therefore, it can also play a significant role in the cost-effectiveness of diets.

What if pigs were more resistant

Ideally the response to nutritional stress factors should consume as little energy as possible or stress reactions should be minimal for better and more consistent feed efficiency. This would be the case if animals were inherently more resistant to nutritional stress factors or were able to adapt to nutritional stressors more energy efficiently.

There is scientific evidence suggesting that for genetic selection, improving the ability of pigs to cope  with stressors may be a better way of improving pig performance than selecting only for increased growth potential. That means the pig needs to be able to adapt faster and more adequately to dietary changes and stress factors for efficient growth performance. Genetic selection is certainly going to play an important role for advancement in this capability of the pig.

Nutritional strategies supporting the speed and efficacy with which the pig adapts to stressors will bring a more immediate competitive advantage in pig production. Most importantly, the ability of the animal to cope with the stressors will also impact the return on investment of diet formulations and profitability of the producer.

Managing gut agility for robust pigs

The gut is particularly responsive to stressors, hence why the emphasis is on the gut when improving the pig’s adaptive response. Gut agility is a new term coined to describe the pig’s ability to adapt to nutritional stressors in a faster and more energy-efficient response than it normally would.

Agile nutritional concepts are designed to boost gut agility and empower animals to adapt to a variety of nutritional stress factors, including mycotoxins, making them more robust and energy efficient. They rely on bioactive substances derived from plants that reduce negative stress reactions, such as oxidative stress, inflammation, reduced gut integrity and reduced feed intake generally seen in response to stressors.

The animal becomes more robust in the face of dietary challenges, resulting in more consistent high performance and well-being. This again will contribute to consistency in the cost-effectiveness of diets under commercial conditions.

Application of Anco FIT

Anco FIT is a gut agility activator, designed to manage gut agility by dietary means and is applied as a feed additive to complete feed. Application of Anco FIT to pig diets empowers animals to adapt to nutritional stress factors more efficiently and live up to their performance potential. For the nutritionist, it provides greater control over the cost-effectiveness of diets.

Nursery diets: Anco FIT is recommended in nursery diets to help piglets adapt to feed transitions quicker and support its defense against nutritional stress factors, including mycotoxins. Expected results are improved feed intakes and growth performance during this important developmental stage of the pig.

Grow-finish diets: In group housing situations feed intake is generally constrained by physical and behavioural factors and energy available from diets will determine commercial performance particularly in the finishing phase. Anco FIT is applied to grow-finishing pig diets Anco FIT is applied to grow-finish diets to reduce the waste of metabolic energy on stress reactions such as oxidative stress and inflammation. The boost to gut agility also supports efficient nutrient adsorption from the gut. Expected results are greater feed efficiency particularly in the face of nutritional stress factors.

Sow lactation diets: Energy demands on modern highly prolific sows are incredibly high during lactation. Efficient dietary energy utilization by the sow during lactation will not only affect litter performance, but also subsequent reproductive performance of the sow. Anco FIT is applied to sow lactation diets to reduce the waste of metabolic energy on stress reactions such as oxidative stress and inflammation. The boost to gut agility also supports efficient nutrient adsorption from the gut. Expected results are high lactation performance and subsequent reproductive capability from improved/more consistent energy efficiency in sows.

For more information on Anco FIT please contact
Anco Animal Nutrition Competence GmbH
Phone: 0043 2742 90502
Email: welcome@anco.net
www.anco.net

Field trial with Anco FIT in antibiotic-free nursery pig diets

Applying Anco FIT in antibiotic-free nursery diets in a field trial under commercial conditions improved growth performance by >20% in the first 3 weeks and by 10% overall (Figure 1 below). Pig producers also reported a reduction in the amount of medication required for nursery pigs.

Impact of stress factors amplified with antibiotic-free diets

Weaning is a particularly stressful period for the pig and since the digestive system is not fully developed yet, the pig is also more susceptible to nutritional stress factors including less digestible nutrients and mycotoxins. This is particularly evident, when diets are fed antibiotic-free.

Importance of feed intake post-weaning

In the early stages post weaning, growth and development of the pig are driven by feed intake in a linear fashion. Scientific studies have shown that for every 0.1 kg extra feed per day during the first week post-weaning, body weight increases about 1.5 kg at the end of the fourth week post-weaning.

Weaning performance affects days to market

Feed intake in the first week post-weaning, also has consequences for later stages of growth. In studies conducted at Kansas State University, pigs that maintained or lost weight during the first week post-weaning required 10 extra days to reach market weight, compared with pigs that gained about 0.25 kg/day during the same period. Wilcock (2009) reported that for every 17g/day in the first twenty days post weaning, an increase of 1kg at slaughter can be expected.

Kansas state

Field trial, in nursery pigs Austria 2016

Commercial nursery pigs were fed antibiotic-free diets containing up to 36% corn, some wheat and some barley. Pigs did not receive medication. Average weaning weight was 9.3kg.

Nursery pigs fed Anco FIT in the diet gained considerably more weight compared to the control pigs, particularly in the first 22 days. This advantage was maintained at 41d weight (Figure 1 below).

Read more about pig production in Austria: here.

Video Link: What matters to Austrian pig farmers feeding Anco FIT

nursery pigs performance

Mayor eficiencia en el rendimiento de los cerdos con agilidad intestinal

La aplicación de agilidad a la nutrición de los cerdos es un enfoque totalmente nuevo para una mayor rentabilidad en la producción animal competitive

Por Gwendolyn Jones
Traducción: Viviana Schroeder R

Los requerimientos nutricionales de cerdos con genotipo moderno están bien investigados. Sin embargo, muchos cerdos no alcanzan su potencial de rendimiento, a pesar de las dietas cuidadosamente formuladas. Esto puede ser debido a factores de gestión y / o medioambientales. Pero también hay factores nutricionales sobre los que tenemos menos control. Pueden dar lugar a toda una serie de reacciones de estrés en el animal y a eficacia subóptima en el rendimiento del cerdo. El hecho es que el cerdo estará sometido a factores estresantes durante toda su vida productiva.

grafik_stoppschild_spanisch
Existe evidencia científica que sugiere que para la selección genética, mejorar la capacidad de los cerdos para hacer frente a los factores de estrés puede ser una mejor manera de mejorar el rendimiento de los cerdos que seleccionar sólo para un mayor potencial de crecimiento. Por lo tanto, el aumento de la capacidad del cerdo para adaptarse a los factores de estrés de manera más adecuada mediante la nutrición también ofrece una alternativa a la mejora de rendimiento de los animales. Lo más importante es que la capacidad del animal para hacer frente a los estresores también tendrá un impacto en el retorno de la inversión (ROI, por sus siglas en inglés) de la formulación de dietas y la rentabilidad del productor.

Ataque los estresores nutricionales
Tradicionalmente, los aditivos se han desarrollado para atacar posibles factores de estrés directamente en el tracto digestivo del animal. Por ejemplo, las enzimas degradan componentes no digeribles específicos como fitato y polisacáridos no amiláceos (NSP, por sus siglas en inglés) en el cerdo para liberar nutrientes atrapados y también reducir los posibles efectos secundarios negativos de estos componentes. ¿Qué pasa con componentes menos digeribles presentes en las dietas que no son blanco específico de las enzimas para alimentación animal?

Antibióticos promotores del crecimiento se han usado por su efecto anti-bacteriano contra ciertas bacterias patógenas. Sin embargo, en muchos países los antibióticos ya han sido prohibidos para uso rutinario en la alimentación animal. Más países están haciendo lo mismo, y hay una mayor necesidad de alternativas eficaces. El ágil intestino le ayuda al animal a adaptarse a los factores de estrés de manera más eficiente y a ser más robusto en vista de los desafíos dietéticos y los estresores.
Adsorbentes de micotoxinas y desactivadores de micotoxinas se están aplicando a las dietas para contrarrestar los efectos nocivos de las micotoxinas en el animal. Sin embargo, es bien sabido que la adsorción no es una estrategia eficaz para todas las micotoxinas. La biotransformación de micotoxinas en metabolitos no tóxicos solamente se dirigirá a ciertos tipos de micotoxinas y es poco probable que sea completa en el tracto digestivo del animal.

Adaptarse a los factores de estrés nutricional
La pregunta es, ¿Qué hace el animal con los factores estresantes que quedan al margen de las soluciones de alimentación altamente específicos mencionados anteriormente? El cerdo tiene que ser más ágil. Como se mencionó con antelación, se pueden lograr mayores resultados en el rendimiento de los cerdos mediante la mejora de la habilidad del cerdo para hacer frente a los estresores. Eso significa que el cerdo tiene que ser capaz de adaptarse más rápido y más adecuadamente a cambios en la dieta y a los factores de estrés para un rendimiento eficiente. La selección genética va a jugar un papel importante para avanzar en esta capacidad del cerdo. Las estrategias nutricionales que apoyan la velocidad y la eficacia con la que el cerdo se adapta a los estresores traerá una ventaja competitiva más inmediata en la producción porcina.

La agilidad en el negocio
Cuando la medida del rendimiento es la rentabilidad, unas pocas empresas grandes en todas las industrias superan constantemente a sus iguales durante períodos prolongados, e incluso mantienen esa ventaja encarando cambios empresariales significativos en sus entornos competitivos. El único factor que tienen en común es la agilidad – se adaptan con éxito. La agilidad es una capacidad que permite a una organización para responder de manera oportuna, eficaz y sostenible cuando las circunstancias cambiantes así lo requieran. Las investigaciones realizadas en el Instituto de Tecnología de Massachusetts sugieren que las empresas ágiles generan 30 por ciento más ganancias que las empresas no ágiles. Otro estudio identificó una mayor eficiencia como un beneficio significativo de una mayor agilidad de la organización.

Agilidad intestinal en los cerdos
La aplicación del concepto de agilidad en el cerdo puede ayudar a desarrollar aún más la eficiencia en la producción porcina. El intestino y el sistema inmunológico son particularmente sensibles a los factores de estrés, de ahí que el énfasis está en el intestino cuando se habla de mejorar la respuesta adaptativa del animal. La agilidad intestinal es un nuevo término acuñado para describir la capacidad del cerdo para adaptarse a los estresores nutricional con una respuesta más eficiente energéticamente y más rápido de lo normal.

Lo que funciona
A medida que las plantas evolucionaron desarrollaron muy sofisticados mecanismos de adaptación a los factores estresantes y las amenazas potenciales para mejorar la supervivencia. Contienen una multitud de sustancias bioactivas, con una variedad de propiedades, tales como anti-oxidantes, anti-inflamatorias, anti-microbianas, anti-virales y aromáticas. La combinación de las muchas sustancias hace que las plantas sean polivalentes ante diferentes factores de estrés. Por tanto, es lógico pensar en la aplicación de extractos de plantas con las estrategias nutricionales desarrolladas para capacitar a los cerdos para adaptarse a los factores de estrés. Las sustancias derivadas de las plantas ya han demostrado ser muy eficaz en la naturaleza, ayudando a las plantas a ser más ágiles para hacer frente a los estresores y amenazas a la supervivencia. Sin embargo, la velocidad de la agilidad intestinal, con el apoyo de sustancias bioactivas en la alimentación, dependerá de encontrar la combinación óptima adecuada para el cerdo y sus desafíos.

Conclusiones
La combinación de estrategias nutricionales con parámetros de selección genética de interés para mejorar la agilidad del tracto gastrointestinal del cerdo podría contribuir a la producción de carne más segura y más rentable en vista de la creciente presión de los consumidores para las dietas libres de antibióticos.