Anco FIT at the world dairy expo

Anco FIT will l be featured at the world dairy expo at the ADM booth, October 3-7 2017.

Dairy farmers in the US, Germany, Austria, Czech Republic and Canada have already reported positive effects with Anco FIT on milk component yields in high producing dairy cows, resulting in economic benefits for famers. The product is currently being rolled out to dairy production in other countries, such as Hungary, Slovakia, Poland and Argentina.

About Anco FIT

Anco FIT contains an adaptation formula based on ingredients which have been specifically selected to help cows adapt to dietary stress factors and perform to their performance potential. Regulating appetite favorably has been shown to be a major benefit of Anco FIT. Positive effects on rumen fermentation have also been shown to enhance subsequent milk component yields in dairy cows. Anco FIT offers ideal dietary support when dairy cattle are nutritionally stressed and is a cost-effective solution for more consistent and profitable dairy production.

Visit the ADM Animal Nutrition booth  EH 1611-1712 to find out more about Anco FIT in dairy cows.

Aflatoxins: Did you know that in high yielding dairy cows the carry-over rate into milk is greater?

Researchers from Cornell University studied the relationship between the carry-over rate of aflatoxins in milk in dairy cows and the level of milk production. Their findings suggest that the current regulations of 20 ppb total aflatoxin levels allowable in dairy cow feed are not protective to avoid violation of the 0.5 ppb AFM1 regulatory levels for milk in high-producing cows.

A factor, that is considered to be important for influencing regulatory limits of both total aflatoxin and AFM1 is the rate at which AFB1 is converted and excreted as AFM1 into the milk of dairy cows.

The problem is that most previous studies on the carry-over of aflatoxins from feed to milk were in what would be considered today as low-yielding dairy cows, where the carry-over of the ingested AFB1 is closer to 1 to 2%.

However, a study carried out by Churchill et al (2016) at Cornell University revealed that the carry-over rate into milk in high yielding dairy cows is closer to 6.5%.

When linear regression was used to calculate the relationship between ingested and excreted concentrations of aflatoxin and AFM1 in milk of high yielding dairy cows, the results suggested that an aflatoxin level of 15 ppb, was the maximum likely to produce milk with aflatoxin below the US regulatory limits (0.5 ppb AFM1 in milk). Currently the FDA guidelines for aflatoxin (AFB1) in feed for dairy cows is at 20ppb.

Find out more about the carry-over rate of aflatoxins into milk in dairy cows at the end of the video below

 

Poultry Africa 2017: Visit the ANCO booth

In October 2017 the Kigali Convention Center in Rwanda hosts the first Poultry Africa exhibition. ANCO will be participating with a booth shared with ADM.

The event, organized by VNU Exhibitions Europe, focuses to connect African and international producers and suppliers in poultry and eggs with the whole African continent. More than 70 companies from Europe, USA and Asia throughout the whole poultry production supply chain have registered as exhibitors. 1,000 visitors from whole Sub-Saharan Africa are expected in a soon to develop region getting ready to be introduced to new products and innovations.

Visit the ANCO booth

Booth EO8
October 4-5, 2017.

Register

http://www.poultryafrica2017.com/

How cows can adapt to DON – Anco article in milling and grain magazine

Ruminants are regarded as quite resistant to fusarium mycotoxins such as deoxynivalenol (DON) because of the detoxifying potential of rumen microbes. However, the detoxification capacity of rumen microbes depends on a functional rumen. Detoxification capacity for DON by rumen bacteria can be compromised in high producing dairy cows, which are fed greater amounts of concentrates and where feed passage rate is high.

Read more about how to best support them by nutritional means.
In “How cows can adapt to DON” published in Milling and Grain Magazine, September 2017, p 70-71  here